Features

All the times Molly Weasley was scarier than a Norwegian Ridgeback

You don’t want to mess with Molly Weasley. Here’s why.

No Image
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

We doubt anyone could run The Burrow quite like Molly Weasley could – managing to keep her big family fed, clothed and yelled at in perfect succession.

To run a huge wizarding family like that required a formidable leader, and Molly was an absolute force to be reckoned with – in fact, we’re pretty sure that, at times, the Weasley brood were warier of their mother’s wrath than if they’d spent a weekend with a Norwegian Ridgeback.

Here are some of Mrs Weasley’s most terrifying moments, just in time for Hallowe’en...

When her kids disappeared suddenly in the night to pick up Harry in a secretly enchanted car

Ford Anglia leaving King's Cross station
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

Yeah… we can kind of see where Molly was coming from here. When Fred, George and Ron flew their dad’s enchanted Ford Anglia into Little Whinging, their focus was on busting Harry out of number four, Privet Drive, action-movie style. They obviously didn’t mention their slightly illegal plans to Mrs Weasley. A decision they definitely regretted later.

Mrs Weasley was marching across the yard, scattering chickens, and for a short, plump, kind-faced woman, it was remarkable how much she looked like a sabre-toothed tiger.
‘Ah,’ said Fred.
‘Oh dear,’ said George.
Mrs Weasley came to a halt in front of them, her hands on her hips, staring from one guilty face to the next. She was wearing a flowered apron with a wand sticking out of the pocket.
‘So,’ she said.
‘Morning, Mum,’ said George, in what he clearly thought was a jaunty, winning voice.
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

When Hermione used her as the perfect threat for Fred and George

No Image
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

Nothing worried Fred and George. They laughed in the face of danger and detention, smirked at the idea of writing lines, literally flew away from Professor Umbridge and even threw snowballs at Professor Quirrell’s turban – aka the face of Lord Voldemort.

There was perhaps only one thing that truly frightened them, and that was their mother... a weapon Hermione used to her full advantage.

‘If you don’t stop doing it, I’m going to –’
‘Put us in detention?’ said Fred, in an I’d-like-to-see-you-try-it voice.
‘Make us write lines?’ said George, smirking.
Onlookers all over the room were laughing. Hermione drew herself up to her full height; her eyes were narrowed and her bushy hair seemed to crackle with electricity.
‘No,’ she said, her voice quivering with anger, ‘but I will write to your mother.’
‘You wouldn’t,’ said George, horrified, taking a step back from her.
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

When she sent that Howler

The Howler screams at Ron over breakfast.
© JKR/Pottermore Ltd. ™ Warner Bros.

When Harry and Ron borrowed the flying Ford Anglia (again!) to get to Hogwarts, Mrs Weasley didn’t hesitate in letting them know exactly what she thought of their escapades. It turns out that Molly, combined with a Howler, was a pretty powerful thing. Who knew?

When Molly taught her sons about proper wand use

No Image
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

When any boy comes of age, it’s always a bit of a bumpy ride. When a wizard comes of age – double it. When it’s Fred and George Weasley coming of age, throw all mathematical equations out of the window. Yes, when the twins were finally allowed to use magic, Molly had to up her battle stations.

‘FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE!’ screamed Mrs Weasley. ‘THERE WAS NO NEED – I’VE HAD ENOUGH OF THIS – JUST BECAUSE YOU’RE ALLOWED TO USE MAGIC NOW, YOU DON’T HAVE TO WHIP YOUR WANDS OUT FOR EVERY TINY LITTLE THING!’
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

When her love for Harry was as fierce as her tellings-off

No Image

Sirius Black was a fascinating and compelling character who formed a bond with Harry while clearly still mourning his father, James. In a heated moment, Molly made Sirius face the grim truth he refused to face.

‘He’s not a child!’ said Sirius impatiently.
‘He’s not an adult either!’ said Mrs Weasley, the colour rising in her cheeks. ‘He’s not James, Sirius!’
‘I’m perfectly clear who he is, thanks, Molly,’ said Sirius coldly.
‘I’m not sure you are!’ said Mrs Weasley. ‘Sometimes, the way you talk about him, it’s as though you think you’ve got your best friend back!’
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

When she came face to face with her future daughter-in-law

No Image

When Mrs Weasley loved you, she’d really go to town. She’d send you Christmas presents, make sure you were always filled with chocolate and even make you your own personal Weasley jumper just so you know you’re truly one of the gang.

When it came to initiating a new family member in the shape of Bill’s beloved Fleur Delacour, however, Molly wasn’t exactly running for her knitting needles. Of course, the pair ended up making up in the end, when the ladies broke down in a tearful hug after Bill’s werewolf attack. But before then, Molly wasn’t exactly in the mood for a girly hour with the part-Veela who’d stolen her eldest’s heart.

‘Mum hates her,’ said Ginny quietly.
‘I do not hate her!’ said Mrs Weasley in a cross whisper. ‘I just think they’ve hurried into this engagement, that’s all! … Bill and Fleur ... well ... what have they really got in common? He’s a hard-working, down-to-earth sort of person, whereas she’s –’
‘A cow,’ said Ginny, nodding. ‘But Bill’s not that down-to-earth. He’s a curse-breaker, isn’t he, he likes a bit of adventure, a bit of glamour ... I expect that’s why he’s gone for Phlegm.’
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

When she took on Bellatrix, and won

Molly Weasley pointing her wand in the final battle
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2

That moment. The one where Mrs Weasley, the loving, homely witch from Ottery St Catchpole, took on one of the most evil forces that recent wizarding history had seen. The one where she finally got the chance to give Bellatrix Lestrange what was coming to her.

When asked why Molly was the one to duel Bellatrix in the final book, J.K. Rowling said: ‘The first reason was I always saw Molly as a very good witch but someone whose light is necessarily hidden under a bushel, because she is in the kitchen a lot and she has had to raise, among others, Fred and George which is like, enough... I wanted Molly to have her moment and to show that because a woman had dedicated herself to her family does not mean that she doesn’t have a lot of other talents.’

We couldn’t agree more.